Newsflash:
About Privacy Policy ERA Articles Senate Democrats look to revive dormant Equal Rights Amendment
Monday, 19 May 2014 23:16

Senate Democrats look to revive dormant Equal Rights Amendment

Written by  Dave McKinney| The Chicago Sun Times
Activists supporting ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment by Illinois lawmakers march along State Street during a 1978 rally. Activists supporting ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment by Illinois lawmakers march along State Street during a 1978 rally. Chicago Sun-Times file photo

SPRINGFIELD-Senate Democrats plan to make an end-of-session push this week to “rectify an historical wrong” -- and perhaps give women a strong reason to go to the polls this fall -- by putting Illinois on record in support of an Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

The bid to revive the Equal Rights Amendment, which was the subject of an epic Statehouse battle in the early 1980s that helped kill the feminist push to amend the U.S. Constitution, comes from state Sen. Heather Steans, D-Chicago and could be a vehicle for Democrats to help spur fall turnout from among women.

Steans has sponsored a resolution that would require approval from both the state Senate and House to make the Illinois the 36th state to ratify the amendment, which provides that “equality of rights under law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex.”

“My hope in passing the ERA is to rectify an historical wrong and serve as a symbol of the ongoing fight for women’s rights and equality,” Steans told the Chicago Sun-Times. “While Illinois has taken a strong place in the fight for marriage equality, history still regards Illinois as the place where ratification of the ERA was stopped.

“We clearly need to guarantee critical rights like equal pay and reproductive freedom, however,” said Steans, whose resolution is scheduled for a hearing Wednesday in the Senate Executive Committee.

In 1982, then-Illinois House Speaker George Ryan, who would go on to become governor, blocked ratification in the state of the Equal Rights Amendment, a move that effectively killed the movement nationally.

Thirty-five states had previously ratified the proposed constitutional amendment, and approval in 38 states is required before the constitution could be amended.

Congress passed the ERA in 1972 and gave states seven years to ratify the amendment. When not enough states had don so by that March 1979 deadline, Congress extended the states’ ratification deadline another five years to June 30, 1982.

Feminist groups have contested the validity of that ratification deadline, and there is a belief among supporters that passage in Illinois could persuade Congress to remove its ratification deadline and give the overall movement a shot in the arm.

In Illinois, the push for ERA was one of the most contentious battles to ever play out at the Capitol.

Up against that 1982 deadline, activists from across the country converged on the state Capitol but encountered difficulty in the Illinois House, where Ryan held the gavel.

They sought Ryan’s support in changing House rules so the measure could pass with a simple majority instead of a three-fifths vote. But the Kankakee Republican, who opposed the ERA, blocked the change, ensuring the legislation’s death.

In response, angry ERA supporters staged one of the most memorable protests at the Capitol in state history by writing Ryan’s name in blood on the floor the statehouse.

“One of the main objections at the time was that the ERA would allow women to be drafted and sent into combat,” Steans said. “Of course, we don’t have a draft today, and we have tens of thousands of women proudly serving their country, including heroes like Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth.”

The last time the ERA surfaced in Illinois was in 2003, when the House, then under Democratic control, passed a ratification bill. But the state Senate didn’t follow suit, again snuffing out support from Illinois for the constitutional amendment.

“While there’s no guarantee a ratification process can be revived, we can undo the historic wrong in Illinois by passing the ERA,” Steans said. “It also puts Illinois legislators on record, so voters can judge whether they’re willing to right the wrongs of the past.”

Link to original article from The Chicago Sun Times

Read 3058 times

PDA In Your State

Sign the TPP Fast Track Petitions

MoveOn.org Petition - Congress Don't Renew Fast Track

Public Citizen Petition - Congress Must Reject Fast Track Authority

MoveOn.org Petition - Stop the Trans Pacific Partnership

CREDO Petition - Stop the Massive Corporate Power Grab