Medicaid Expansion

Medicaid Expansion (7)

As a growing number of reports increasingly make clear, a state’s decision whether to expand Medicaid as part of health reform has real-life effects on its residents and its businesses. In the 26 states and the District of Columbia that have expanded Medicaid (see map), the positive benefits are already playing out. Here’s some of the latest information:

We pledge allegiance to “One nation, under God.” When terrorists attack us, we unite as one to defend our nation and our countrymen and women. Yet, we allow the doctrine of the Confederacy — states’ rights — to divide us, even to the point of costing Americans their lives.

Charlene Dill, a resident of Florida, was a 32-year-old mother of three. She worked three jobs to try to support those children, despite having a serious heart condition. She earned too much — $11,000 a year — to be eligible for Medicaid under Florida law. She would have been able to get expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

Accepting Obamacare’s optional Medicaid expansion could be a better financial deal for states than initially predicted, according to new data from the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

In last spring’s Republican primary, U.S. Senate candidate Thom Tillis ran an ad touting his fight against an expanded Medicaid program. “Thom Tillis has a proven record fighting against Obamacare,” the narrator said. “Tillis stopped Obama’s Medicaid expansion cold. It’s not happening in North Carolina, and it’s because of Thom Tillis.” 

The Senate Finance Committee advanced a new state budget without Medicaid expansion, but the deal fast-tracked by legislative leaders was delayed Thursday night after a Republican senator proposed an amendment aimed at preventing Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe from expanding the program without General Assembly approval.

The state battle over expanding medicaid is affecting local healthcare providers.

The Free Clinic of Franklin County is re-thinking how it will provide services to the uninsured population.

A group of his constituents met last week with Del. Michael J. Webert (R-18th/Marshall) to tell him how lack of adequate health care affects them and to enlist his support for a solution. From all ages and walks of life, they met Thursday, Aug. 7, at the cooperative extension service office in Warrenton.

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