A powerful tornado ravaged a city on the U.S.–Mexico border on Monday, “destroying homes, flinging cars like matchsticks and ripping an infant from its mother’s arms,” reports the Associated Press.

Across the border, the governor of Texas declared states of disaster in 24 counties due to the flash flooding that has killed at least three people, while at least 12 remain missing. One of the dead was a firefighter in Oklahoma who was swept into a storm drain while he was trying to evacuate a 5-year-old’s birthday party, according to Fox News. “He’s our hero. That’s for sure,” the 5-year-old’s grandfather Steven Darnell told Fox 23.

Published in Stop Global Warming

On April 1, California Governor Jerry Brown stood in a field in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, beige grass stretching out across an area that should have been covered with five feet of snow. The Sierra’s snowpack — the frozen well that feeds California’s reservoirs and supplies a third of its water — was just eight percent of its yearly average. That’sa historic low for a state that has become accustomed to breaking drought records.

Published in Stop Global Warming

In its first six months of existence, the world’s first solar road is performing even better than developers thought.

The road, which opened in the Netherlands in November of last year, has produced more than 3,000 kilowatt-hours of energy — enough to power a single small household for one year, according to Al-Jazeera America.

Published in Stop Global Warming

LOS ANGELES — Gov. Jerry Brown issued an executive order Wednesday dramatically ramping up this state’s already ambitious program aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions, saying it was critical to address what he called “an ever-growing threat” posed by global warming to the state’s economy and well-being.

Published in Stop Global Warming

Documents obtained by Greenwire show that FERC employees are actively and frequently seeking employment with the companies they regulate.

Apparently, much like an Ivy League business or law degree, having FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) on your resume makes you a hot commodity on the job market, especially in the very industries—power utilities, oil and gas companies and natural gas exporters—that FERC regulates. 

Published in Stop Global Warming

Dust produced by mountaintop removal mining sites are a known cancer risk, but little has been done to protect inhabitants of Appalachia

For many in central Appalachia, the fight against reckless strip mining operations recalls a popular t-shirt in West Virginia: “Save the Endangered Hillbilly.” It’s not really a joke; decades of contempt and disregard for rural mountaineers underscore an existence no less threatened than local wildlife.

Published in Stop Global Warming

Calling for a "national, coordinated response to the humanitarian disaster of mountaintop removal mining," CREDO Action launched an extraordinary petition drive this past weekend for Congress to pass the Appalachian Community Health Emergency Act (ACHE Act) and place an immediate moratorium on "the deadliest and most destructive form of coal mining." Within 24 hours, over 50,000 signatures had joined the campaign.

Published in Stop Global Warming

'This deferral represents serious complacency towards the urgent need for action on climate change,' student group warns.

Alumni and students of Britain's Oxford University are up in arms over the school's deferral of a plea to pull shares of its $3.9 million endowment from fossil fuel companies.

Published in Stop Global Warming

With mountaintop removal mining on the ropes, as the last bank financiers ditch lending support amid new scientific research that demonstrates "solid evidence that dust collected from residential areas near mountaintop removal sites causes cancerous changes to human lung cells," residents from across central Appalachia's coal country are converging on Monday, March 16, at the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection headquarters in Charleston to demand an end to new permits.

Published in Stop Global Warming

'The nation can deploy wind power to economically provide 35 percent of our nation's electricity and supply renewable power in all 50 states by 2050,' says Obama administration

The economics of wind power are looking good, according to a 350-page report issued Thursday by the U.S. Department of Energy, which states that the nation's swiftly expanding wind industry could help America significantly reduce its carbon emissions, support more than 600,000 jobs, and provide 35 percent of the United States's electricity needs, all by the year 2050.

Published in Stop Global Warming
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