Economic and Social Justice

Economic and Social Justice (145)

In our post-modern (or post-post-modern?) age, we are supposedly transcending the material certainties of the past. The virtual world of the Internet is replacing the “real,” material world, as theory asks us to question the very notion of reality.  Yet that virtual world turns out to rely heavily on some distinctly old systems and realities, including the physical labor of those who produce, care for, and provide the goods and services for the post-industrial information economy. 

Despite laws on the books, the median woman in America working full-time throughout the year is still paid just 79 cents for every dollar earned by a man.

In an effort to narrow wage discrimination and a persistent gender pay gap, President Barack Obama unveiled new rules on Friday that would require U.S. companies with more than 100 employees to provide summary pay data by gender, race, and ethnicity.

 

Paul Mason, ardent critic of neoliberalism, sees a new epoch ahead.

Economics professors like to demonstrate the inherent flaws of Soviet-style command economies by asking students to imagine what would have happened if the Soviet Union had tried to create Starbucks. Presumably, a Soviet Starbucks would have offered only two kinds of coffee—black or white—until it ran out of milk, or coffee, or both. In his new book, Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future, British economics journalist Paul Mason invites us to re-run this thought experiment. This time, imagine Amazon, Toyota or Boeing trying to create Wikipedia. A successful outcome is equally unthinkable.

More than 20 congressional Democrats invited Muslim guests to President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union address Tuesday, to counter what they say is negative rhetoric on Capitol Hill and speeches on the presidential campaign trail.

'It is inhumane for DHS officials to disregard these threats and cause fear and anguish for immigrant families,' say Progressive Caucus co-chairs

'To poison all the children in an historic American city is no small feat'

Rick Perlstein on the Chicago mayor; Adam Gopnik and Amy Wilentz on Charlie Hebdo; and Rebecca Solnit on climate change in the Himalayas.

More than one a day.

That is how often mass shootings (four or more people wounded or dead) occurred in the United States this year. Including the worst shooting of the year (so far), which unfolded only yesterday in San Bernardino, a total of 462 people have died and 1,314 have been wounded in such attacks these past eleven months.

Right now, the future seems dark and frightening and it is precisely now that we must continue to imagine other worlds and then plot ways to get there.

Study of Forbes 400 finds nation's wealthiest own more wealth than the bottom 61 percent of the country, or 194 million people

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