Voter Access Protection/Election Integrity

Voter Access Protection/Election Integrity (51)

The first phase in Alabama was passing a strict voter ID law. The second phase was to close down more than 90 percent of DMV offices. The third phase may involve restricting voting to just four spots, unless the trend is reversed. And your state may be the next one to emulate Alabama.

Slashing funding to the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency (ALEA) involves draconian budget cuts that would eventually eliminate 45 of 49 driver's license offices. For a state with one of the lowest voting rates in the country, that trend is sure to continue its decline.

It may seem strange, but Virginia Republicans experienced a moment of clarity and were honest about something — specifically, that they don’t want likely Democratic voters’ ballots to matter all that much.Virginia may have gone the way of supporting President Barack Obama in the 2012 election, but the state’s districting map is drawn in such a way that Republicans were able to pick up eight of the eleven districts. One would never expect the GOP to admit that this is intentional, but that’s absolutely what happened.



If you live in Alabama and need to register to vote before the 2016 presidential election, it just got a little harder, especially if you live in any of the counties where black Americans make up more than 75% of the registered voting population.

Because due to "budget constraints" - 31 DMV offices are losing their driver's licenses examiners. 

Who would have thought that "The Donald" - the leading candidate for the GOP Presidential nomination - would on two occasions bring up the issue of buying off members of Congress with donations? The first time was during the first GOP debate in early August in front of a national TV audience of millions. The obscene amounts of money buying politicians during this cycle will surely surpass the amounts raised in the last Presidential and Congressional elections, and those Super PACs are taking in unprecedented amounts of cash, all the while being allowed to conceal the identities of their donors. This amounts to little more than legalized bribery, which the Supreme Court has aided and abetted with their rulings on McCutcheonCitizens United, and similar decisions. The McCutcheon decision by the Roberts Court removed aggregate limits on donations, making the former $123,000.00 per person, per cycle limit seem like peanuts compared to what can be given now.

Businesses in Columbia, Missouri attempted to use their political pull to throw taxes at consumers instead of themselves, but a massive failure in their gerrymandering effort left them with one major roadblock: a 23-year-old college student who, on February 28, became the only registered voter in the district.

The NAACP 'Journey for Justice' from Selma, Alabama will conclude in Washington D.C. with a rally, but the people's movement may decide to stay.

The Moral Monday protests that galvanized disenfranchised voters across North Carolina—and elsewhere—may soon become a regular fixture in the halls of Congress. 

Kansas loves them some voter fraud hysteria. From going to the Supreme Court to try and make doubly-sure that non-citizens can’t vote in their elections to setting up a voter fraud website where citizens can reportevery kind of voter fraud except the kinds that have actually happened in the state, Kansas is on the forefront of voter fraud readiness and protection.

Except, perhaps, when it comes to the machines they use to record their votes.

A botched voter purge prevented thousands from voting—and empowered a new generation of voting-rights critics.

On November 7, 2000, Willie Steen, a Navy vet who had served in the Persian Gulf during Desert Storm, went to cast his ballot for president at the St. Francis Episcopal Church in Tampa, Florida.

One of the nation’s whitest, coldest and most rural states may have a new superlative to add to the list: most democratic.

After taking 22 factors into account, Maine’s democracy ranks healthiest in the nation in a new report from the Center for American Progress Action Fund, the advocacy wing of the liberal Center for American Progress. Alabama’s was weakest, though even top-ranking Maine was far from perfect.

Fifty years ago, African-Americans were denied the right to vote. Now the vast majority of Americans are being denied the rightful value of their vote.

In November 1963, Evelyn Butts, a seamstress and mother of three from Norfolk, Virginia,
filed the first lawsuit in federal court challenging her state’s $1.50 poll tax. Annie Harper, a retired domestic worker from Fairfax County, filed a companion suit five months later. In March 1966, the Supreme Court overruled two previous decisions and overturned Virginia’s poll tax, stating that economic status could not be an obstacle to casting a ballot.

Page 1 of 4

Support Postal Banking



Featured News

  • Security Guards from Chicago’s O’Hare Airport Join One-Day Nationwide Airport Worker Strike +

    Security guards at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago walked off the job yesterday as part of a wave of labor Read More
  • TPP Media March +

     Join our Twitter Storm every #TPPTuesday!   6 PM PT | 9 PM ET Everyone with a Twitter account can participate. Read More
  • Louisiana Just Voted to Give a Quarter of a Million People Health Care +

    Republican Sen. David Vitter lost his bid to be the next governor of Louisiana on Saturday, and it wasn't even close. The Read More
  • Florida Liberal Compares Rick Scott's Opposition to Syrian Immigrants to Turning Back on Jews Fleeing Nazi Germany +

    Susan Smith, the president of the Democratic Progressive Caucus of Florida, compared Gov. Rick Scott to American officials who did Read More
  • Election 2016 preview: State Senate, Assembly and US Congress +

    Local races for the California legislature are often a snooze fest. Incumbents rarely lose, and the districts have a sufficient Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41
  • 42
  • 43
  • 44
  • 45
  • 46
  • 47
  • 48
  • 49
  • 50
  • 51
  • 52
  • 53
  • 54
  • 55
  • 56
  • 57
  • 58
  • 59
  • 60
  • 61
  • 62
  • 63
  • 64

Does Your Legislator Support the ERA