Citing uncertainty over whether Florida’s Stand Your Ground law is about to change, the judge in Marissa Alexander’s criminal case has delayed her trial until Dec. 1. Alexander, 33, is charged with three counts of aggravated assault after firing a shot in the direction of her estranged husband, Rico Gray, and his two young children during an argument.
Florida’s controversial Stand Your Ground law will once again be no refuge for Marissa Alexander, the Florida woman who fired what she said was a warning shot near her abusive husband, Rico Gray, and his two sons.

On Friday, Circuit judge James H. Daniel denied her request for a new hearing to seek immunity from prosecution under the law, finding that the legislature’s June revision to include such warning shots ”cannot be applied retroactively” for a new Stand Your Ground hearing.

GENEVA, Aug 29 (Reuters) - The U.N. racism watchdog urged the United States on Friday to halt the excessive use of force by police after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman touched off riots in Ferguson, Missouri.

Featured News

  • The Growing Call to #GetMoneyOut +

    This week, local activists in 12 states delivered petitions in support of a constitutional amendment to get big money out Read More
  • How the Money Primary Is Undermining Voting Rights +

    Fifty years ago, African-Americans were denied the right to vote. Now the vast majority of Americans are being denied the Read More
  • Booker's position on trade could help define him +

    WASHINGTON – Trade could be a defining issue for Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey as he works to establish credibility Read More
  • TPP Media March +

        Join our TPP Twitter Storm. Everyone with a Twitter account can participate. The Twitter storm begins on Tuesday Read More
  • The World's Carbon Dioxide Levels Just Hit a Staggering New Milestone +

    The monthly global average concentration of carbon dioxide just broke 400 parts per million for the first time since record-keeping Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41

Does Your Legislator Support the ERA

 

ERAMap