The federal government has subsidized the criminalization of millions of young people simply for having a small amount of pot. “Whites Smoke Pot, but Blacks Are Arrested.” That was the headline of a column by Jim Dwyer, the great Metro desk reporter for The New York Times, in December 2009.
Now that the ballots have been counted and the citizens of the commonwealth have spoken, we need Gov.-elect McAuliffe and our elected officials to focus on revamping our criminal justice system. Moving forward, efforts must be made to make the system more effective, less costly, and fairer — restoring faith in the system so that it can work for all Virginians.
As the Senate prepares to take up changes to federal sentencing and parole guidelines, some Republicans and Democrats break from their parties' traditional stances. For decades the Republican Party prided itself for being tough on crime, often putting Democrats on the defensive by pushing for longer, mandatory sentences for convicts.

Featured News

  • Washington Supreme Court Rules All SeaTac Workers Must Be Paid $15 Minimum Wage +

    SeaTac workers have a reason to celebrate after the Washington Supreme Court ruled 5-4 yesterday that the $15 minimum wage Read More
  • How the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Keeps Working People Poor and Destroys the Environment +

    The Chamber of Commerce is a juggernaut in the American political system, and it doesn't use that power to fight Read More
  • Banking On Bondage: Private Prisons And Mass Incarceration +

    Executive Summary The imprisonment of human beings at record levels is both a moral failure and an economic one — especially Read More
  • Congress Is Sick of the Secrecy Around the TPP +

    And Senator Sherrod Brown is blocking a key Obama nominee to show it. The Trans-Pacific Partnership is in its final Read More
  • The Racist Roots of the GOP’s Favorite New Immigration Plan +

    Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41
  • 42
  • 43
  • 44
  • 45
  • 46
  • 47
  • 48
  • 49
  • 50
  • 51
  • 52
  • 53
  • 54
  • 55

Does Your Legislator Support the ERA

 

ERAMap