Newsflash:
ERA 3 State Strategy Economic and Social Justice Greedy Oligarchs Oppose Minimum Wage
Saturday, 12 April 2014 18:25

Greedy Oligarchs Oppose Minimum Wage

Written by 
Chicago Raise the Minimum Wage Rally Chicago Raise the Minimum Wage Rally SEIU

One of the hot issues in this year’s political races is whether the Federal minimum wage should be increased.  It might seem obvious that if lower-income people had more money to spend it would be good for almost everyone.  President Obama and the Democrats have proposed that it be raised from its current $7.25 an hour to $10.10.  Certainly, it would benefit the 17 million workers who’d get the increase—two-thirds of them women, who generally make less than men to start with.  So raising the minimum wage would be a step toward pay equity. Some states have higher minimums, but none above the proposed level. Two states, Maryland and Connecticut have moved theirs up to the $10.10 level.

Many small business owners support a higher minimum wage. A 2013 poll by Greenberg Research showed 67% believe a higher wage is not only fairer, but will increase sales as customers have more money to spend. Smart business people have known this since at least 100 years ago when Henry Ford voluntarily raised wages at his Ford plant to get the best workers, keep them longer, and pay them enough money to buy his Model T’s.

So why do some folks, including most Republican members of Congress, oppose increasing the minimum wage? Some may honestly believe raising wages will cause unemployment. They found a bit of support for this view in estimates from the Congressional Budget Office. But the CBO, it turns out, looked mostly at academic literature, rather than reality on the ground. The fact is that states with the highest wages tend to have lower unemployment. And we know that since the first national minimum wage was signed into law by President Franklin Roosevelt during the Great Depression, our economy has gone mostly up. More recently, since the value of the minimum wage—measured against the value of the dollar—peaked in 1968, the real wages of ordinary working people have gone down. For those of us coming up in the ‘50’s and ‘60’s, with the gains in civil rights and women’s rights, as well as the economy, things were looking up. It was an optimistic future.

The strongest opposition to raising wages seems to come from libertarians who believe almost all government regulation is bad, and the super wealthy who seem never to be satisfied with their massive wealth and want to get even more, by holding everyone else down. Both of these groups—which often overlap, as when David Koch was a Libertarian candidate--say that if employers are free to pay lower wages they’ll hire more people and that will help them and the economy. But a look at history will make clear that doesn’t work.

I used to ask my students, “What was the minimum wage in the South before 1860?” Of course, the answer is zero. Millions of people were forced to work in the South for literally slave wages—zero. For those who were enslaved, there was full employment alright, whether you wanted it or not. People were minimally fed and housed, and that’s about it. I don’t mean to minimize the horrible institution of slavery, and I’m not saying the oligarchs of today want to return to actual slavery, but they do favor abolishing minimum wages, which would force people to compete for jobs at ever lower pay. In such a system, especially with a labor surplus, there would be a downward spiral, with the end result something like slavery, where you’re forced to work for food and shelter, but you’re paid almost nothing, and the owner typically lives far away where he can’t see the suffering caused by his low wages. Yes, you might have the freedom to move, but how far can you go without money? In today’s world, as a few high-living, greedy billionaires gobble up businesses coast to coast, it may be pointless to move. And they oppose unions, which could help by increasing pressure for better pay. It should be pointed out that the same oligarchs who oppose minimum wages and unions also fund efforts to make it harder for us to vote. They talk about an opportunity society, but what they really mean is an exploitive society, with them using us to make more money.

Exaggerated picture? Maybe. But it’s no exaggeration to note that for millions of working Americans, no matter how hard they work, they barely tread water. It’s not a matter of education, either, since the large majority of minimum wage earners now have high school degrees or more—and in spite of the propaganda aimed at downgrading and privatizing our schools, kids are better educated than ever. Nor are the minimum wage earners “kids.” Their average age is 35 and they bring home about half of their family’s income.

No one knows for sure all the effects of any government or business policy in the long run, but we certainly know it’s not fair for people to work day in and day out and barely be able to keep a roof over their heads. America’s future can be brighter than that—if we organize and if we vote.

Read 7716 times Last modified on Saturday, 12 April 2014 18:36
Jack Burgess

Jack Burgess, retired teacher and writer, has been a union staffer for the Columbus Education, where he helped lead the effort to get endorsements for the Equal Rights Amendment, negotiated the first maternity leave benefits for teachers, equal funding for girls' sports, and racial desegregation of staff and students of the Columbus Public Schools. He's also served as Ohio Coordinator for SEIU, working with 925 toward legislation helping women and men working in Ohio's offices. In addition, he organized and chaired the West Side Civic Association in Chillicothe, served as board president of the Godman Guild Settlement House in Columbus, and spokesperson for several progressive organizations. He's a published poet and married to Kathleen Burgess, music teacher and poet as well. He has four children, now grown. His columns on education, government, and politics appear regularly in several Ohio newspapers.

PDA In Your State

Join "Countdown to Coverage" Share TPP with your Daily Newspaper

CWA devised a simple plan for which they were uniquely suited: drag TPP out of the shadows and into the light - one city at a time - using a medium they understand intimately: Daily Newspapers!

Two CWA members - Dave Felice in Denver, CO and Madelyn Elder in Portland, OR have started the ball rolling. We just need to keep up the momentum leading up to a big day of petition deliveries.

Button-ShareTPPWithNewspaper

Step 1 is to send an Op-Ed to your Daily Newspaper.

Write Your Local Newspaper and say We Can Create Jobs Now

Congress has a solution for creating jobs and job training programs but the newspapers never talk about that. Government isn't broken and government can create jobs. Make sure that people in your community know that this is possible.

Step 1 is to send an Op-Ed to your Daily Newspaper.

Sign the ERA Petition

ERADemandButton

On Friday, September 12th more than 150 activists will go to DC and Demand that their Senators and Representatives support removing the ratification deadline from the ERA (SJ Res 15 and HJ Res 113)

Button-SignERAPetition

Sign the Petition - Sen. Sanders Run as a Democrat in 2016

Button-SandersPetition

ERA 9/12 Senate Briefing

ERA - January 15th Round Table

Hand Deliver a Letter to your Rep on Jobs

If your Representative is not currently a cosponsor of HR 1000 they may not completely understand how important full employment is to your community; click on your state at the bottom of this page to see all the cosponsors in your state. Nothing sends a stronger message to a Congressional member than a personal visit to a district office by a voter with a written request. Phone calls and emails are incredibly important but nothing gets attention like a personal visit. Our Educate Congress page has information and a sample letter. Print the letter, sign it, deliver it.

Button-HandDeliver

ERA Videos

VA State Legislature

Marena Groll
Moral Monday - Fayetteville

January 15th Progressive Round Table